A Perfect Fit Crochet Hook

A Perfect Fit Crochet Hook

The other day I saw a post here that inspired me. The post is about improving your crochet by having the right crochet hook. I have been crocheting forever, making chains on my fingers when I was a little kid. I haven’t thought about the hooks I use improving my crochet. The problem is I don’t have the money to spend on new crochet hooks but I got an idea. I could make the hooks I have better for me. The metal hooks are fine but I could use a better grip, plus I have been working on a crochet mermaid blanket for a year. I really need to finish it for my daughter and maybe this will help.

I decided to wrap a crochet hook in polymer clay and mold it to my grip. Guess what? It works wonderfully and one package of clay will probably do about three hooks maybe four. It is a much cheaper way to go than buying new hooks.

A Perfect Fit Crochet Hook

I bought Halloween colors of clay recently and instead of buying more I used them for my hook. Using about a quarter from each package, I conditioned the clay first.

A Perfect Fit Crochet Hook

Then using  my dedicated clay pasta machine I ran each color through to make them flat.

A Perfect Fit Crochet Hook

I then put them together and rolled them through again.

 

A Perfect Fit Crochet Hook

I folded the ribbon of clay a couple of times.

A Perfect Fit Crochet Hook

One more roll through and I was happy with how it looked.

A Perfect Fit Crochet Hook

Time to cut it down.

A Perfect Fit Crochet Hook

And roll the hook into the clay.

A Perfect Fit Crochet Hook

Once the hook was encased in clay I cut off the excess. Then I smoothed the clay at the top and bottom.

A Perfect Fit Crochet Hook

I then held the hook how I would if I were crocheting and put pressure where my thumb and fingers grip it.

A Perfect Fit Crochet Hook

It doesn’t look great but it fits my hand perfectly. The clay gives the hook  a bit more weight which feels better too.

A Perfect Fit Crochet Hook

To prevent the clay from flattening on the tile when I baked it, I used polyester fiberfill to cushion it. I baked it according to the instructions on the packaging. After baking, I let it completely cool.

A Perfect Fit Crochet Hook

A Perfect Fit Crochet Hook

It works great and I think I’ll be able to finish this mermaid blanket soon. You can find me as deedle89 on Ravelry.

I will be linking up with these parties.

Until Next TimeKileen (3)

 

A Perfect Fit Crochet Hook

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Easy Fabric Pumpkins

Easy Fabric Pumpkins

Easy Fabric Pumpkins

Fabric pumpkins are all over the craft blogs and Pinterest but I wanted to put my spin on them. Plus who can’t use a few more pumpkins during the fall. They are so easy to make I had four of them done in about an hour.

I used some leftover white fabric from the flag I made for the Fourth of July and some white muslin I purchased. The other materials used were jute cord, polyester fiberfill, needles (one regular and one yarn needle), thread, and a small package of driftwood pieces I picked up at one of the craft stores.

I began by cutting out rectangles for the pumpkins. I wanted different sized pumpkins so I cut out some big and some smaller rectangles. Call me a cheater, but I pulled out my sewing machine and sewed up the sides. Although it would be a quick hand sew if you don’t have one.

Fabric pumpkins with jute cord and driftwood stems.

This is a piece of my leftover fabric. I used the pattern on it for one pumpkin horizontally and vertically for the other pumpkin.

Fabric pumpkins with jute cord and driftwood stems.

Now I have a tube.

I gathered the bottom of the fabric with a running stitch and secured it. Turning the fabric right side out, I began to stuff.

Fabric pumpkins with jute cord and driftwood stems.

Easy stitch in and out of the fabric.

Fabric pumpkins with jute cord and driftwood stems.

All gathered up, ready to turn right side out.

Fabric pumpkins with jute cord and driftwood stems.

Fabric pumpkins with jute cord and driftwood stems.

I stuffed my pumpkin rather full but you can stuff it to your liking.  To close it I gathered the top together the same way I did the bottom of the pumpkin.

Fabric pumpkins with jute cord and driftwood stems.

Fabric pumpkins with jute cord and driftwood stems.

Next, I threaded my yarn needle with the jute. Starting at the top, I threaded it through the middle of the pumpkin out through the bottom.

Fabric pumpkins with jute cord and driftwood stems.

Fabric pumpkins with jute cord and driftwood stems.

Fabric pumpkins with jute cord and driftwood stems.

Bringing the cord back up to the top on the outside of the pumpkin, I knotted it with the tail I left hanging out.

Fabric pumpkins with jute cord and driftwood stems.

Make sure it is tight before knotting it. I continued threading the jute until I had five or six indentations on the pumpkin.

Fabric pumpkins with jute cord and driftwood stems.

After my last one, I threaded the jute back through the pumpkin to the bottom and weaved it through the other cords. Bringing it back through the middle of the pumpkin, I knotted it off with the other tail that was sticking out.

Fabric pumpkins with jute cord and driftwood stems.

The stems were last and I cut a few of them down. I added some of the cord to the bottom of a few of the stems. Then I hot glued them into the top of the pumpkins. Done! 🙂

I wish I had one of those big wooden dough bowls and a large farmhouse table to put it on and throw the pumpkins into.

 

Fabric pumpkins with jute cord and driftwood stems.

Fabric pumpkins with jute cord and driftwood stems.

I will be linking up with these parties.

 

Until Next TimeKileen (3)

 

Easy Fabric Pumpkins

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